Welcome Back to Euclid Beach Park

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After the auction with the carousel secure as a unit, the horses and chariots were sent to Carousel Magic (Note 3) in Mansfield, Ohio for restoration.  During restoration it was determined that four of the original 58 horses were missing.  Their whereabouts unknown.  Since the auction EBPN was in contact with Cleveland Tomorrow (Note 4), who now owned the carousel. Cleveland Tomorrow asked EBPN if they would be interested in start a campaign to raise funds to have four replacement horses made and EBPN jumped at the opportunity. $25,000.00 was raised and the horses made.  Euclid Beach Park Nut's founder David Scott became ill and passed away that July.  When asked by Carousel Magic how EBPN members wanted the four horses painted a unanimous decision was to have one of the four horses dedicated to David Humphrey Scott. That horse is pictured here to the left. The saddle blanket painted as a Scottish Clan Tartan, The Euclid Beach Park main gate painted at the rear with the initials DHS under the arch.

(Note 3 Carousel Magic has since closed)

(Note 4 In 2004 Cleveland Tomorrow merged with the Greater Cleveland Growth Association and the Greater Cleveland Roundtable to form the Greater Cleveland Partnership.

David Humphrey Scott

April 13, 1925 - July 30, 1998

Euclid Beach Park Now was founded mid 1989 by David Humphrey Scott. At its founding the club's name was Euclid Beach Park Nuts as members were "Nuts" over Euclid Beach Park.


David was born to Dudley and Louise Scott. Dudley Scott was Euclid Beach Park's chief engineer from 1908 until his death in 1938. The Scott family lived at the park as housing for year round park employees was available. So, David was born and raised at Euclid Beach Park.  He referred to himself and other park employee children who lived at the park as "Park Brats."  As David got older he spent many hours with his dad checking the operation of the many motors used to run the roller coasters and other park rides.  He went along with his dad at times to check the condition of the tracks on the park's roller coasters.

The anticipation and response for the book, "Euclid Beach Park is closed for the season," published in 1977, showed that there was still a strong interest in Euclid Beach Park.  David couldn't have been happier to see this interest.  Using moving pictures his father took at Euclid Beach Park and other amusement parks, he gave presentations in Cleveland and the surrounding suburbs to clubs and organizations. The summer of 1989 The Cleveland Museum of Health (Note 1) had a Euclid Beach Park memorabilia show to which David was invited.  He was reunited with former park employees, friends, and others with fond memories of the amusement park.  A few of these individuals started meeting monthly at David's house to share memories.  It was decided that a fan club should be formed with a newsletter.  It was thought that maybe they would get 200 to sign on as members, instead 1,000 became card carrying "Nuts."

(Note 1 The Cleveland Museum of Health has since closed.)


Euclid Beach Park Nuts stated to sponsor a yearly memorabilia show at Euclid Square Mall (Euclid, Ohio) in their community room.  Every year the "Mall Show," held the weekend closest to Euclid Beach Park's September 28 closing, got larger and soon expanded into the mall. During a meeting with mall management EBPN's show committee was told that memorabilia show brought in the most foot traffic than any mall event.  Other sites were tried. For two years a memorabilia show was held at Trolleyville U.S.A. (Note 2) in Cleveland's west side suburb of Columbia Station. The first was scheduled for July 19, 1997.  This same year an auctioneer was secured to sell Euclid Beach Park's old carousel that was sold and moved to a small amusement park in Old Orchard Beach, Maine operating their from 1970. The auctioneer knew of the Euclid Beach Park Nuts having seen many the year before at the auction for Old Indiana Fun Park. Many rides, signs, park benches, etc, found their way to this amusement park located in Thornton, Indiana.  The auctioneer called David to ask if a venue may be available in the Cleveland area to hold the auction for the Euclid Beach Park Carousel and David mentioned the memorabilia show scheduled at Trolleyville U.S.A.  EBPN was aware and concerned about the future of the carousel and had already started a campaign in hopes of saving the ride as a whole and not see the horses and chariots sold off individually. 

(Note 2 Trolleyville U.S.A. closed down in 2005)

CLUB HISTORY

Euclid Beach Park Now

Euclid Beach Park Now (EBPN) honors and preserves the memory of arguably  Cleveland, Ohio's most beloved amusement park  EUCLID BEACH PARK, which operated from 1895 through 1969.

Getting involved with fund raising and hoping to be an active participant in getting the carousel restored and operational the board members of EBPN started looking to have the organization become a non-profit organization. Articles of Incorporation were filed with Ohio's Secretary of State in July of 2000.  EBPN's filing was accepted. That was the easy part, filling out the form for the IRS to become tax exempt took longer. In 2005 EBPN thought when applying for grants "Nuts" in the name of the organization may not be taken seriously so in 2005 "Nuts" became "Now". 


Euclid Square Mall fell on tough times which saw many empty spaces throughout the mall ending the EBPN "Mall Shows." The mall has gone through various transitions and is currently empty and closed awaiting its next usage.  While looking  for other venues for memorabilia shows, EBPN was contacted by Northeast Shores Development Corporation and asked about participating in the annual "East 185th Street Festival."